Review: The Book of Longings by Sue Monk Kidd

This weekend I did something I rarely do. I talked to my mom about a book. She isn’t a reader. She likes that I read, she likes my job, she thinks all of these qualities are good things but she would much rather doddle in the kitchen or work in her garden than pick up a book. 

It’s okay. We’re different people. 

Anyway, I was talking to her about The Book of Longing. She wasn’t the first person I approached. She wasn’t the last. But she was the biggest departure from my traditional bookish circle. 

I spent the whole weekend with Kidd’s latest story in my heart and on my mind. It weighed on me. 

Looking back I don’t know what else I expected to happen. 

The Book of Longings is the story of Ana, the wife of Jesus. Yes, that Jesus. The one on the cross, with all of those churches. Jesus. Except Jesus is only here to play second fiddle to Ana and her wonderful story as a scribe, a believer, and a woman of her own mind. 

I went into Longings skeptical. In the wrong hangs this story could either be fanatical fanfiction or straight sacrilege.  I’m happy to say I was proven wrong. While the novel has a slow (and slightly horrific) start it really finds its stride in the marriage of Ana and Jesus. They are a good match, with character and living situations informed by diligent research and understanding of the time.  I spent my first reading session picking through the Authors Note at the end of the text. I needed some comfort about the level of research and intention. In a similar way that I cannot seem to bring myself to read Setterfield’s new novel about an alternate reality for Hilary Clinton I could see the purpose and power in Kidd’s work. I highly recommend reading the authors note for The Book of Longings if you are skeptical, also if you want to know more about the research process and about histories both real and liberally adapted. 

Now for the actual story. 

I found myself engrossed in the political drama, the religious inspirations, and the day to day tasks of a house wife in equal measure. Ana’s longing to be a voice and to share the stories of silenced women is honorable in any age, but especially in the first century. She is iconic in her own right – clever, educated, and compassionate. Kidd managed to create a character bigger than her historically significant (hello understatement) husband. Go Sue Monk Kidd. 

I also appreciated the treatment of sensitive material. I was not looking forward to reading about the crucifixion. I was raised Lutheran with very religious parents. I’ve taken to praying more during this crazy time and finding some solace in thinking about faith in a more holistic way. I was still worried about how a modern author would treat the bases of Christianity. 

I wasn’t disappointed. I was upset. I was horrified. I don’t do well with body horror in any context. But the scenes were tasteful. They were powerful. They were important for Ana. In the same way I appreciate how the rest of Ana’s long and successful life was portrayed. I started The Book of Longings thinking that I was hitching my horse to a character I couldn’t get behind for the sake of a sensational story and found myself routing for an incredible and fully developed character in a precarious place in time and history that could stand on her own two feet. 

Honestly I can’t recommend this book enough. I have major reading hangover right now and not even my recent package from my local indie bookstore can seem to snap me out of it. Maybe tomorrow I can fall in love with a new book but today I will honor Ana and continue to talk about her strength and voice with anyone who will listen.

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